Quantcast Assess Distal Neurovascular Function. - Treating Fractures in the Field

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
d. Remove Jewelry, If Appropriate. If the casualty has a suspected fracture of
the arm, remove any jewelry on the injured arm and put the jewelry in the casualty's
pocket. If the limb swells, the jewelry may interfere with blood circulation. The jewelry
may then have to be cut off to restore adequate blood circulation.
e. Assess Distal Neurovascular Function. Check for impairment of the
nerves and/or circulatory system below the site of the suspected fracture. Some of the
methods used to identify impairment are given below.
(1)  Check pulse. Palpate a pulse site below the fracture site. If no pulse or
a weak pulse is found, the fracture may be putting pressure on the artery or may have
damaged the artery. A weak pulse can be determined by comparing the pulse felt
below the fracture with the pulse felt at the same location on the uninjured limb. A
casualty with no pulse below the fracture site should be evacuated as soon as the limb
is splinted.
(2)  Check capillary refill. If the fractured limb is an arm, press on the
casualty's fingernail, then release. If normal color does not return within two seconds,
the limb may have impaired circulation. This is also called the blanch test.
(3)  Check skin temperature. Touch the casualty's skin below the fracture.
Coolness may indicate decreased or inadequate circulation. Compare the temperature
of the injured limb to the temperature of the same area on the uninjured limb.
(4)  Check sensation. Ask a conscious casualty if he can feel your touch.
Then lightly touch an area below the fracture. For example, if his arm is fractured, touch
the tip of the index and little fingers on the injured arm. Ask the casualty if the injured
limb feels numb or has a tingling sensation.
(5)  Check motor function. Ask a conscious casualty to try opening and
closing the hand of an injured arm or moving the foot of an injured leg. If the attempt
produces pain, have the casualty stop his efforts.
f. Dress Wounds. If the fracture is open, apply a field dressing or improvised
dressing the wound before splinting the limb. Do not attempt to push exposed bone
back beneath the skin. If the bone slips back spontaneously, make a notation of the
fact on the casualty's U.S. Field Medical Card (FMC). The card is initiated after
treatment is completed and accompanies the casualty to the medical treatment facility.
g. Immobilize Fracture. Immobilize the fracture to relieve pain and to prevent
additional damage to tissues at the fracture site due to movement of the fractured
bone(s). If an extremity is fractured, apply a splint using the following general rules.
CAUTION:
The general principle is "splint the fracture as it lies." Do not reposition
the fracture limb unless it is severely angulated and it is necessary to
straighten the limb so it can be incorporated into the splint. If needed,
straighten the limb with a gentle pull.
MD0533
1-8



Medical News
Duncan kin, some at hospital near end of Ebola isolation
A 21-day quarantine for extended family of the first Ebola...
medicalxpress.com
Texas hospital apologizes over handling of Ebola case
The Texas hospital that cared for the first patient to...
medicalxpress.com
Viagra protects the heart beyond the bedroom
Viagra could be used as a safe treatment for heart...
medicalxpress.com
Head injury causes the immune system to attack the brain
Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain...
medicalxpress.com
Scientists say national Alzheimer's plan milestones must be strengthened to meet goal by 2025
The U.S. Government has initiated a major effort to prevent...
medicalxpress.com
Mummy remains refute antiquity of ankylosing spondylitis
Ankylosing spondylitis is a systemic disease that causes inflammation in...
medicalxpress.com
Group B streptococcus incidence rises significantly among newborns
The findings suggest that this disturbing trend could be due...
medicalxpress.com
Study shows medication is frequently, unintentionally given incorrectly to young children
According to Nationwide Children's Hospital researchers, 63,000 children under the...
medicalxpress.com
Test shows Spain nursing assistant clear of Ebola
A Spanish nursing assistant appears to have recovered from the...
medicalxpress.com
Metabolic genetics research paves way to treating diabetes and obesity
Breaking down complex conditions such as Type 2 Diabetes and...
medicalxpress.com
EM Nerd: Unclog the "Clogged Pipes" Model (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- PCI is rarely helpful in ACS patients....
medpagetoday.com
Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain and inflammation in cataract surgery patients
The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and...
medicalxpress.com
Experimental Ebola vaccine expected in Geneva Tuesday: hospital
Canada will start sending more than 1,000 doses of an...
medicalxpress.com
Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells
At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and...
medicalxpress.com
New insight that 'mega' cells control the growth of blood-producing cells
While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal...
medicalxpress.com
Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice
Researchers have successfully transplanted "organoids" of functioning human intestinal tissue...
medicalxpress.com
Spike in ER Use Short-Lived After Medicaid Expansion
(MedPage Today) -- State budgets unlikely to take big hit,...
medpagetoday.com
Microbiome May Link Jet Lag to Obesity, Disease (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Circadian rhythms in intestinal microbes affect the...
medpagetoday.com
For many journalists Ebola's invisible threat scarier than war
You can't see shells falling, guns pointed or identify the...
medicalxpress.com
Children's genes affect their mothers' risk of rheumatoid arthritis
A child's genetic makeup may contribute to his or her...
medicalxpress.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +