Quantcast Assess Distal Neurovascular Function. - Treating Fractures in the Field

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
d. Remove Jewelry, If Appropriate. If the casualty has a suspected fracture of
the arm, remove any jewelry on the injured arm and put the jewelry in the casualty's
pocket. If the limb swells, the jewelry may interfere with blood circulation. The jewelry
may then have to be cut off to restore adequate blood circulation.
e. Assess Distal Neurovascular Function. Check for impairment of the
nerves and/or circulatory system below the site of the suspected fracture. Some of the
methods used to identify impairment are given below.
(1)  Check pulse. Palpate a pulse site below the fracture site. If no pulse or
a weak pulse is found, the fracture may be putting pressure on the artery or may have
damaged the artery. A weak pulse can be determined by comparing the pulse felt
below the fracture with the pulse felt at the same location on the uninjured limb. A
casualty with no pulse below the fracture site should be evacuated as soon as the limb
is splinted.
(2)  Check capillary refill. If the fractured limb is an arm, press on the
casualty's fingernail, then release. If normal color does not return within two seconds,
the limb may have impaired circulation. This is also called the blanch test.
(3)  Check skin temperature. Touch the casualty's skin below the fracture.
Coolness may indicate decreased or inadequate circulation. Compare the temperature
of the injured limb to the temperature of the same area on the uninjured limb.
(4)  Check sensation. Ask a conscious casualty if he can feel your touch.
Then lightly touch an area below the fracture. For example, if his arm is fractured, touch
the tip of the index and little fingers on the injured arm. Ask the casualty if the injured
limb feels numb or has a tingling sensation.
(5)  Check motor function. Ask a conscious casualty to try opening and
closing the hand of an injured arm or moving the foot of an injured leg. If the attempt
produces pain, have the casualty stop his efforts.
f. Dress Wounds. If the fracture is open, apply a field dressing or improvised
dressing the wound before splinting the limb. Do not attempt to push exposed bone
back beneath the skin. If the bone slips back spontaneously, make a notation of the
fact on the casualty's U.S. Field Medical Card (FMC). The card is initiated after
treatment is completed and accompanies the casualty to the medical treatment facility.
g. Immobilize Fracture. Immobilize the fracture to relieve pain and to prevent
additional damage to tissues at the fracture site due to movement of the fractured
bone(s). If an extremity is fractured, apply a splint using the following general rules.
CAUTION:
The general principle is "splint the fracture as it lies." Do not reposition
the fracture limb unless it is severely angulated and it is necessary to
straighten the limb so it can be incorporated into the splint. If needed,
straighten the limb with a gentle pull.
MD0533
1-8



Medical News
ESC: Gout Drug Some Help in Heart Surgery (CME/CE)
BARCELONA (MedPage Today) -- Giving the gout drug colchicine perioperatively...
medpagetoday.com
ESC: Novel Heart Failure Drug a Game-Changer (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- An investigational heart failure drug being developed...
medpagetoday.com
Tax forms could pose challenge for HealthCare.gov
If you got health coverage through President Barack Obama's law...
medicalxpress.com
Sudden death predictor identifies ICD candidates in new ESC Guidelines
Saturday 30 August 2014: A new sudden death predictor for...
medicalxpress.com
The early cost of HIV: Inflammatory response breaks down intestinal lining, but help may come from friendly bacteria
Researchers at UC Davis have made some surprising discoveries about...
medicalxpress.com
First expert consensus on ventricular arrhythmias published
The first expert consensus on ventricular arrhythmias is published today....
medicalxpress.com
First comprehensive ESC Guidelines on aortic diseases published
The first comprehensive ESC Guidelines on aortic diseases are published...
medicalxpress.com
First recommendations on all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism published
The first recommendations on the use of all new oral...
medicalxpress.com
First multidisciplinary recommendations on management of arrhythmias in ACS patients
The first multidisciplinary recommendations on the management of arrhythmias in...
medicalxpress.com
ESC/EACTS revascularization guidelines stress benefit of revascularization in stable CAD
The therapeutic benefit of revascularisation in coronary artery disease (CAD)...
medicalxpress.com
Study shows cavities have become the most common childhood disease
A Washington Post blog entry published earlier this week reports...
scopeblog.stanford.edu
Study shows cavities have become the most common childhood disease
A Washington Post blog entry published earlier this week reports...
scopeblog.stanford.edu
CMS Shuts Down Sunshine Act Database -- Again
WASHINGTON (MedPage Today) -- The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid...
medpagetoday.com
Tweet of the Week: Where We Donate vs. What Kills Us
(MedPage Today) -- Welcome to another edition of the MedPage...
medpagetoday.com
ZMapp Ebola Drug Effective in Macaques (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- A controversial cocktail of Ebola antibodies was...
medpagetoday.com
Friday Feedback: VA Lessons
(MedPage Today) -- In hindsight, what are the real lessons...
medpagetoday.com
This Week: Publication Bias, Lagging FDA
(MedPage Today) -- A study on publication bias, a lagging...
medpagetoday.com
MOC Watch: CRNA Version Raises Hackles
(MedPage Today) -- Doctors are up in arms about maintenance...
medpagetoday.com
Options for weight loss your primary care doctor might not know about
August 29, 2014 - Despite US Preventive Services Task Force...
medicalxpress.com
Report advocates improved police training
A new report released yesterday by the Mental Health Commission...
medicalxpress.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +