Quantcast Active Immunity - Immunizations and Environmental Injuries

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
1-11. ACTIVE IMMUNITY
a. Immunity acquired naturally is called active immunity. An individual can have
the disease, recover, and become permanently immune. Measles, chickenpox,
whooping cough, scarlet fever, typhoid fever, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and
diphtheria are examples of such diseases. The person has chickenpox, recovers, and
has a permanent immunity to chickenpox. There are other diseases which an individual
can have and recover from but not develop a lasting immunity. The group of infections
called "the common cold," influenza, gonorrhea, septic sore throat, and some types of
pneumonia are examples. A person can have a cold, recover, and get another cold.
b. When an individual has a disease, antibodies form within the body in
response to the stimulation of natural infection or of infectious agents. The antibodies
develop slowly, usually after about 10 to 14 days. The length of time the immunity lasts
varies depending on the disease.
1-12. ARTIFICIAL IMMUNITY
It is not always convenient or desirable for an individual to have a disease in
order to become immune to that disease. Scientists, therefore, have developed artificial
processes, such as vaccination, which simulate nature but which are adapted to meet
practical requirements and which are under human control. Two major types of these
processes are active artificial immunity and passive artificial immunity.
a. Active Artificial Immunity. There are several ways of achieving this
immunity: injection of living, attenuated, or harmless organisms; injection of dead
organisms; and injection of bacterial exotoxins.
(1)  Injection of living attenuated (weakened) or harmless organisms. This
type of immunity can be acquired by artificially imitating nature's method of mild
infection thus producing immunity. Smallpox, polio, rubella, measles, mumps,
adenovirus, and yellow fever are examples of diseases in which an active artificial
immunizing agent is used.
(a) Smallpox. The virus vaccinia, which causes cowpox in cows, when
transmitted to humans in a vaccination causes a mild condition at the site of the
vaccination. This is sufficient to give an individual protection from smallpox for a period
of from one to ten years, depending on the person and the environmental conditions.
1 The vaccination is performed on the arm over the deltoid
muscle. Clean the site gently. Energetic cleansing may create abrasions which may
become infected forming "satellite lesions." Apply antiseptics such as ether or acetone
(not alcohol) and allow the site to dry thoroughly. Failure to allow the antiseptic to dry
may cause the vaccine to be inactivated.
MD0587
1-8



Medical News
New targeted therapy shows promise against breast cancer
Pfizer's new targeted drug, palbociclib, has been shown to halt...
medicalxpress.com
Study finds no need for lymph node surgery in some melanomas
Worldwide, people who are diagnosed with melanoma are urged to...
medicalxpress.com
Drug boosts long-term survival after breast cancer
After a diagnosis of localized breast cancer, women are often...
medicalxpress.com
New research shows immunotherapy targeting several cancers
Immunotherapy, which has shown remarkable success against advanced melanoma skin...
medicalxpress.com
'Ebola will return', veteran scientist warns
Congolese expert Jean-Jacques Muyembe may be little known to the...
medicalxpress.com
ESMO announces scale to stratify magnitude of clinical benefit of anticancer medicines
ESMO, the European Society for Medical Oncology, has announced today...
medicalxpress.com
Combining targeted drug with chemotherapy offers longer life to b-cell cancer patients
Because of the significant benefit found in combining the targeted...
medicalxpress.com
Targeted drug can 'diminish the suffering' of myelofibrosis
Use of the targeted agent pacritinib significantly reduced the symptoms...
medicalxpress.com
Psychoanalytic Gut? That's Improbable!
(MedPage Today) -- The science of orange skin, and the...
medpagetoday.com
Removing more breast tissue reduces by half the need for second cancer surgery
Removing more tissue during a partial mastectomy could spare thousands...
medicalxpress.com
Celecoxib safe, effective for brucellosis-associated depression
(HealthDay)—Celecoxib seems safe and effective for treatment of depression due...
medicalxpress.com
Outpatient uterine polypectomy more cost-effective
(HealthDay)—For women with abnormal uterine bleeding and hysteroscopically diagnosed endometrial...
medicalxpress.com
RYGB cuts markers of oxidative stress in subcutaneous tissue
(HealthDay)—Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery attenuates markers of oxidative stress...
medicalxpress.com
AMA: Physicians driving the slowing of health care costs
(HealthDay)—Low physician spending is contributing to an overall slowing of...
medicalxpress.com
Rapamune approved for rare lung disease
(HealthDay)—Rapamune (sirolimus) has been approved by the U.S. Food and...
medicalxpress.com
Weight-based enoxoparin dosing best for obese after C-section
(HealthDay)—Weight-based dosing of enoxaparin is more effective than body mass...
medicalxpress.com
Catheterization increasing for seniors with STEMI
(HealthDay)—From 1999 to 2009 there was a decrease in the...
medicalxpress.com
Doctors' checklist could help decrease length of COPD patients' hospital stay
Patients with worsening chronic obstructive pulmonary disease spend less time...
medicalxpress.com
FDA warns of complications from facial fillers
(HealthDay)—Soft tissue fillers used in cosmetic procedures can accidentally be...
medicalxpress.com
Pentagon: Anthrax shipments broader than first thought
The Pentagon said Friday that the Army's mistaken shipments of...
medicalxpress.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +