Quantcast The uterus - Special Surgical Procedures

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
d. The levator ani muscles, varying in thickness and strength, may be divided
into three parts: the iliococcygeal, the pubo-coccygeal, and the puborectal muscles.
The fibers of the levator ani blend with muscle fibers of the rectum and vagina. The
fibers (pubovaginal) of the pubococcygeal part of the levator ani muscles, lying directly
below the urinary bladder, are involved in the control of micturition. The pubococcygeal
fibers of the levator ani control and pull the coccyx forward and assist in the closure of
the pelvic outlet. The fibers pull the rectum, vagina, and bladder neck upward toward
the symphysis in an effort to close the pelvic outlet and are responsible for the flexure at
the anorectal junction. Relaxation of the fibers during defection permits a straightening
at this junction. During parturition, the action of the levator ani directs the fetal head into
the lower part of the passageway.
e. The uterus gains much of its support by its direct attachment to the vagina
and by indirect attachments to nearby structures such as the rectum and pelvic
diaphragm. The ligaments and muscles on each side of the uterus are the broad,
round, cardinal (Mackenrodt), and uterosacral ligaments and the levator ani muscles.
2-3.
THE UTERUS
The uterus, which occupies a central place in the pelvis, is a pear-shaped organ
directed downward and backward. At the upper lateral points, the uterus receives the
uterine tubes (Fallopian tubes). The fundus of the uterus is the upper rounded portion
situated above the level of the tubal openings. The main portion of the uterus is called
the body. Below, the body of the uterus joins the cervix, from which it is separated by a
slightly constricted canal, called the isthmus. The cervix lies at the level of the ischial
spines. The lumen of the body of the uterus communicates with the cervical canal at
the internal orifice, called the internal os. The cervical canal ends at the vaginal
opening of the cervix called the external os. This is a small oval aperture situated
between two lips.
2-4.
THE STRUCTURE OF THE UTERUS (FIGURE 2-3)
a. The Greek word for uterus is hystera. The uterus lies behind the bladder and
in front of the rectum (see figure 2-3). The uterine body has three layers: (1) the outer
peritoneal, or serous layer, which is a reflection of the pelvic peritoneum; (2) the
myometrium, or muscular layer, which houses involuntary muscles, nerves, blood
vessels, and lymphaticus; and (3) the endometrium, or mucosal layer, which lines the
cavity of the uterus.
b. The cervix consists of a supravaginal and a vaginal portion. The supravaginal
portion is closely associated with the bladder and the ureters. The vaginal portion of the
cervix projects downward and backward into the top of the vaginal vault.
MD0928
2-4



Medical News
Flinders sleep experts try new tactic to fight fatigue
In a world-first, sleep experts from Flinders University are attempting...
medicalxpress.com
Reducing medication errors with scanning system that ensures patients get the right pills
MIT alumni entrepreneurs Gauti Reynisson MBA '10 and Ívar Helgason...
medicalxpress.com
Different forms of Alzheimer's have similar effects on brain networks
(Medical Xpress)—Brain networks break down similarly in rare, inherited forms...
medicalxpress.com
Rapid response teams halve hospital heart attack deaths
Detecting and treating patients before they have a cardiac arrest...
medicalxpress.com
Specialists hope to obtain vaccine against Chagas disease in less than three years
Mexican and American researchers are working on developing a vaccine...
medicalxpress.com
Neuroscientists watch imagination happening in the brain
(Medical Xpress)—"You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not...
medicalxpress.com
Conflicts with teachers are risk factor for school shootings
As part of the TARGET project funded by the German...
medicalxpress.com
Eating your five-a-day is the key to a sexy sun-kissed glow
Forget sun beds, sunbathing and fake tanning lotions. The secret...
medicalxpress.com
Ebola vaccine trials being fast-tracked: researchers
Safety trials on an Ebola vaccine are being fast-tracked, meaning...
medicalxpress.com
UN: Ebola cases could eventually reach 20,000
The World Health Organization says the Ebola outbreak in West...
medicalxpress.com
Fresh warning over Ebola as regional crisis talks start
The Ebola epidemic gripping West Africa will get worse before...
medicalxpress.com
Girls in Colombian town struck by mystery illness
A mystery illness has overwhelmed a small town in northern...
medicalxpress.com
Cold cash just keeps washing in from ALS challenge
In the couple of hours it took an official from...
medicalxpress.com
Uruguay begins registering marijuana growers
Just a handful of people had registered by midday Wednesday...
medicalxpress.com
Three-quarters of depressed cancer patients do not receive treatment for depression, new approach could transform care
Three papers published in The Lancet Psychiatry, The Lancet, and...
medicalxpress.com
Better classification to improve treatments for breast cancer
Breast cancer can be classified into ten different subtypes, and...
medicalxpress.com
Does non-conformity fuel creativity?
When you think about it, visionaries and inventors like Steve...
scopeblog.stanford.edu
Oral contraceptive equal to antibiotics for acne care
(HealthDay)—At six months, oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) are comparable to...
medicalxpress.com
Study Question Surveillance Colonoscopy (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Removal of adenomatous polyps--without follow-up surveillance colonoscopy--led...
medpagetoday.com
Polyp removal doesn't always signal raised colon cancer risk, study says
(HealthDay)—Doctors may be performing too many repeat colonoscopies on people...
medicalxpress.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +