Quantcast Section III. Analeptic Agents (Brain Stem Stimulants) - Pharmacology I

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(3)  Methamphetamine hydrochloride (Desoxyn). This drug is similar to
dextroamphetamine in terms of its ability to suppress the appetite. However, its abuse
potential is such that it is rarely used any longer for this purpose.
c.  Other Agents. Many other drugs produce pharmacological effects similar
to those produced by the amphetamines. These are most often used for their ability to
suppress the patient's appetite. Sometimes you will find these medications combined
with other drugs (for example, a sedative or an antianxiety agent) in order to counteract
the stimulation they produce.
(1)  Pemoline (Cylert). This drug is used in the treatment of ADHD. It is
usually prescribed in a graduated dose - beginning with a 37.5-milligram daily dose. It
is then gradually increased at 1-week intervals of 18.75 milligrams until a desired clinical
response is observed. The most common side effect seen with this agent is insomnia.
Pemoline appears to have a lower abuse potential than methylphenidate; pemoline is
classified as a Note Q drug. The drug is supplied in the form of 18.75, 37.5, and 75
milligram tablets.
(2)  Diethylpropion hydrochloride (Tenuate). Diethylpropion hydrochloride
is used as an appetite suppressant. It is less effective in this use than the
amphetamines. It produces such side effects as dryness of the mouth, nausea, and
headaches. It is available in both 25-milligram tablets and 75-milligram (timed-release)
tablets. Diethylpropion is a Note Q drug.
(3)  Phendimetrazine tartrate (Prelu-2). This drug is used as an appetite
suppressant. Long-term use of the drug, especially in large doses, may produce
psychic dependence. It produces such side effects as nervousness, excitement,
euphoria, and dryness of the mouth. It is supplied in 35-mIlligram tablets and capsules
and 105-milligram (timed-release) capsules. Phendimetrazine is a Note Q drug.
Section III. ANALEPTIC AGENTS (BRAIN STEM STIMULANTS)
10-6. INTRODUCTION
a.  Analeptic agents are drugs that produce two primary effects. One, they
stimulate the nerve cells of the body's respiratory center when it has been depressed by
some condition (for example, illness or drugs). Two, they stimulate nerve cell centers
responsible for keeping a person conscious.
b.  Analeptic agents are not commonly used today because of the stimulation
they produce in doses sufficient to produce their analeptic effect. These agents can
produce such undesirable effects as convulsions, respiratory problems, or vomiting.
MD0804
10-5



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