Quantcast Caring for the Eyes, Ears, and Nose - Basic Patient Care Procedures

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
1-8.
CARING FOR THE EYES, EARS, AND NOSE
a. General. The eyes, ears, and nose require special attention for cleansing
during the patient's bath. The specialist has the responsibility of assisting patients in the
care of eyeglasses, contact lenses, artificial eyes, or hearing aids. Assessments must
be made of the patient's knowledge and methods used to care for the aids, as well as
any problems he might be having with the aids. Patients with limited mobility cannot
grasp small objects. Patients that have reduced vision or are seriously fatigued will also
require assistance from the specialist.
b. Important Points. The eyes, ears, and nose are sensitive and therefore
extra care should be taken to avoid injury to these tissues. Never use bobby pins,
toothpicks, or cotton-tipped applicators to clean the external auditory canal. Such
objects may damage the tympanic membrane (eardrum) or cause wax (cerumen) to
impact within the canal.
c. Procedure.
(1)
Care of the eyes.
(a) Cleansing of the circumorbital (circular area around the eye) area of
the eye is usually performed during the bath, and involves washing with a clean
washcloth moistened with clear water. Do not use soap because of the possibility of
burning and irritation. The eye is cleansed from the inner to outer canthus. A separate
section of the washcloth is used each time. This is to prevent spread of infection. Place
a damp cotton ball on lid margins to loosen secretions. Never apply direct pressure
over the eyeball. Exudate from the eye should be removed carefully, and as often as
necessary to keep the eye clean.
(b) The eyelashes, tearing, and split-second blink reflex usually keeps
the eyes well protected. An unconscious patient may need frequent special eye care.
Secretions may collect along the margins of the lid and inner canthus when the blink
reflex is absent or when the eyes do not completely close. The physician may order
lubricating eye drops. In some cases, the eyes may be medicated and covered to
prevent irritation and corneal drying.
(c)  Many patients wear eyeglasses. The specialist will use care when
cleaning glasses, and protect them from breaking. Eyeglasses should be stored in the
case and placed in the drawer of the bedside stand. Glasses are made of hardened
glass or plastic that is impact resistant to prevent shattering, but they can easily be
scratched. Plastic glasses require special cleaning solutions and drying tissues. Warm
water and a soft dry cloth may be used for cleansing glass lens.
MD0556
1-19



Medical News
New York law offers nurses more recognition, responsibility
If past experience is anything to go by, nurse practitioners...
medicalxpress.com
Pain and itch may be signs of skin cancer
Asking patients if a suspicious skin lesion is painful or...
medicalxpress.com
Poland suffers first cases of African swine fever in pigs
Poland on Wednesday confirmed its first cases of deadly swine...
medicalxpress.com
Greater odds of adverse childhood experiences in those with military service
Men and women who have served in the military have...
medicalxpress.com
Monitoring pulse after stroke may prevent a second stroke
New research suggests that regularly monitoring your pulse after a...
medicalxpress.com
Enhanced recovery program following colorectal surgery at community hospitals
An enhanced recovery program for patients after colorectal surgery appears...
medicalxpress.com
Study examines postoperative pneumonia prevention program in surgical ward
A postoperative pneumonia prevention program for patients in the surgical...
medicalxpress.com
FDA warns of compounded drug recall by Texas firm
(AP)—The Food and Drug Administration is warning doctors not to...
medicalxpress.com
Hormones after breast cancer: Not fuel for the fire after all?
A new study supports a growing body of research suggesting...
medicalxpress.com
More on the Navy pilot with mysterious symptoms – and the Stanford doctors who diagnosed him
Last week, we blogged about a Navy pilot whose mysterious...
scopeblog.stanford.edu
Monitoring, Dose Adjustment for Pradaxa? (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Blood level monitoring and dose adjustment for...
medpagetoday.com
'Kick' Study Excites AIDS Meeting
(MedPage Today) -- MELBOURNE, Australia -- A trial with only...
medpagetoday.com
Lymphoma Drug Gets Trio of FDA Approvals
WASHINGTON (MedPage Today) -- The FDA has approved the novel...
medpagetoday.com
Researchers find unsuspected characteristics of new CF drugs, offering potential paths to more effective therapies
In lab experiments using tissue samples cultured from cystic fibrosis...
medicalxpress.com
Video Games Help Teens Gain HIV Smarts
(MedPage Today) -- MELBOURNE, Australia -- If you want teenagers...
medpagetoday.com
Medicare Alters Hospice Drug Rule
(MedPage Today) -- In response to strong criticism, Medicare officials...
medpagetoday.com
3D Printed Cadavers: Ready for Prime Time?
(MedPage Today) -- Three-dimensional printing has promised to revolutionize fashion,...
medpagetoday.com
Journal raises concern about blood-thinning drug
A medical journal raised concerns Wednesday about a blood-thinning drug...
medicalxpress.com
Targeting the brain to treat obesity
Unlocking the secrets to better treating the pernicious disorders of...
medicalxpress.com
3D image of Paleolithic child's skull reveals trauma, brain damage
3D imaging of a Paleolithic child's skull reveals potentially violent...
medicalxpress.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +