Quantcast CPD and CPDA-1. - Immunohematology and Blood Banking I

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
(5)  The auxiliary preservative solutions in the additive systems are not
approved for whole blood, plasma components, platelets, or for use in plasma-pheresis
procedures. The anticoagulant CP2D has been approved for the preparation of routine
blood components including single donor plasma, cryo-precipitated antihemophilic
factor, and platelet concentrate.
(6)  Certain measurable biochemical changes occur when blood is stored at
1C to 6C. These changes, some of which are reversible, are known as the "storage
lesion" of blood. These changes are tabulated for CPD and CPDA-1 stored blood in
table 1-2 and additive systems in Table 1-3. Except for oxygen-transporting discussed
below, these rarely have clinical significance because transfusion volumes are small
and the recipient's compensatory homeostatic mechanisms reverse these changes.
Even in massive transfusion, the adverse effects of the red cell storage lesion are
usually inconsequential unless the recipient is already severely compromised.
(7)  In red cell storage and preservation, it is important to maintain oxygen-
carrying and oxygen-releasing capacities of hemoglobin. The concentration of red cell
2,3-DPG influences the release of oxygen to the tissues. If 2,3-DPG levels are high,
more oxygen is released at a given PO2. Lower red cell levels of 2,3-DPG cause greater
affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen so that less oxygen is released at the same PO2.
(8)  Concentrations of 2,3-DPG are affected by pH. The initial pH of blood
collected in CPD and measured at the temperature of storage is approximately 7.4 to
7.5. As stored red blood cells metabolize glucose to lactate, hydrogen ions accumulate,
plasma pH falls, and 2,3-DPG declines. Table 1-2 tabulates these changes for CPD and
CPDA-1. During the second week of storage, the pH of CPD stored blood falls below
7.0. As pH drops, there is a fall in red cell 2,3-DPG. Concentrations of 2,3-DPG are
normal in CPD-stored blood for about 10 days. When blood is stored in CPDA-1, 2, 3-
DPG levels initially fall slightly more rapidly than in CPD, but near normal levels are
maintained for 12 to 14 days.
(9)  Following transfusion, stored red blood cells regenerate ATP and 2,3-
DPG, resuming normal energy metabolism and hemoglobin function as they circulate in
the recipient. It usually takes from 3 to 8 hours for severely depleted cells to regenerate
half of their 2,3-DPG levels and approximately 24 hours for complete restoration of 2,3-
DPG and normal hemoglobin function. In red cell storage, maintaining cell viability is
unclear. On theoretical grounds, recipients likely to be most affected by low 2,3-DPG
levels in transfused blood are those receiving massive quantities of stored blood in a
short time, and those particularly vulnerable to the effects of tissue hypoxia; examples
include newborns undergoing exchange transfusion, patients with small blood volume
who receive large volumes of blood, and patients undergoing coronary artery bypass
surgery. Such patients usually receive blood less than 7 to 10 days old.
MD0845
1-37



Medical News
Proteins may slow memory loss in people with Alzheimer's
Certain proteins may slow the devastating memory loss caused by...
medicalxpress.com
Tpl2 enzyme may be target for treating autoimmune diseases
New research at the University of Georgia has found that...
medicalxpress.com
1950s drug is future heart treatment
Oxford University researchers have found a promising future treatment for...
medicalxpress.com
Faster heart rate linked to diabetes risk
An association between resting heart rate and diabetes suggests that...
medicalxpress.com
India's street dentists filling gap for the poor
Ignoring noisy buses and curious onlookers, street dentist Allah Baksh...
medicalxpress.com
Head injuries could result in neurodegenerative disease in rugby union players
A new article publishing online today in the Quarterly Journal...
medicalxpress.com
By the Book: How to Roll Out a New Chest Pain Pathway
(MedPage Today) -- A new chest pain protocol?...
medpagetoday.com
Time is muscle in acute heart failure
Urgent diagnosis and treatment in acute heart failure has been...
medicalxpress.com
Raising a glass to the holidays
Asking people about what they drink on holidays and other...
medicalxpress.com
10 Questions: Theodore A. Bass, MD
(MedPage Today) -- 'There has to be a way of...
medpagetoday.com
Women’s health experts tackle mood disorders and sexual assault
Earlier this week I reported from the Women’s Health Forum, held on...
scopeblog.stanford.edu
Mood instability common to mental health disorders and associated with poor outcomes
A study by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology...
medicalxpress.com
Research identifies best treatment for blood pressure in diabetic kidney disease
Blood pressure lowering drugs do not improve life expectancy among...
medicalxpress.com
Statins May Cut Stroke in Seniors (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Results won't change guidelines, but may be...
medpagetoday.com
Heroin Is Tops for Keeping Addicts in Treatment (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- But finding says more about conflicting evidence...
medpagetoday.com
Applying visual techniques to med school lessons
Quick! When a person is deprived of oxygen, which part...
medicalxpress.com
PAD Patients Get Moving With Behavioral Therapy (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Intervention encourages at-home exercise, leading to mobility...
medpagetoday.com
A New Generation of Innovators
(MedPage Today) -- David Nash, MD, MBA, spotlights one medical...
medpagetoday.com
Smoking rates continue to drop in many states: CDC
(HealthDay)—Cigarette smoking continues to decline in about half of American...
medicalxpress.com
Breath-holding games are killing swimmers, CDC warns
(HealthDay)—As more adults and kids head to swimming pools, lakes...
medicalxpress.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +